Home » News » Mercury, Evinrude confirm Alumacraft supply agreement termination

Mercury, Evinrude confirm Alumacraft supply agreement termination

By Tim Hennagir

Corporate officials at Mercury Marine and Evinrude Marine Group have confirmed the end of an engine supply agreement involving boat manufacturer Alumacraft, which was acquired in late June.

“We communicated our decision to end the supply agreement a week after the news came out earlier this summer.  Our main focus has been to work with our dealers through the transition and this also provides great opportunities for other boat brands.”

Mercury Marine initially communicated its decision to end the supply agreement a week after Evinrude announced it would acquire Alumacraft, said Director of Global Public Relations & Communications Lee Gordon.

“Our main focus has been to work with our dealers through the transition and this also provides great opportunities for other boat brands,” Gordon told Boating Industry Tuesday morning.

Evinrude Marine Group was disappointed that Mercury made the decision to end the engine supply agreement, which provided dealers and consumers with a choice of product, said Nando Zucchi, vice president, marketing and international business development, in an emailed statement.

"We have been very pleased with the reaction we have received from Alumacraft's dealers and their interest in supplying Evinrude engines,” Zucchi said. “We stand committed to providing world-class products to the network and will continue to work hard to to earn their trust and their business."

3 comments

  1. Classic Mercury response. They have no problem buying other brands of boats and 'closing" the transoms to other engines, but won't take the opportunity to put their engines on a competitor's boats. Buying Mercurys is like feeding the bear that ultimately wants to eat you. As a Dealer, I try to avoid them.

  2. That just adds credence to the fact that Mercury has a very difficult time competing with the powerful Etec's from personal experience.

  3. Mercury doesn't have a difficult time competing with E-Tec's. All one needs to do is look at transoms when you go to the water. E-Tec's are absent for the most part. I'm not bashing their product. I believe they are a well designed good performing engine, The majority of the market wants 4-stroke, it's just a reality.

    I don't see why BRP doesn't leverage their Rotax 4-stroke technology for use in outboards. They have some impressive engines and technology that would transfer into some advanced outboards. It would broaden the choices they could offer the consumer. A G2 midsection with a Rotax designed 4-stroke powerhead for example would likely be a very impressive platform..

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*